What to Know Before Buying Outsourced Food for High Tea

Tea is well-loved by many, especially Australians. It’s an essential part of their culture. Besides, tea is back as one of the main foodservice products in Australia today, as people’s preference for non-coffee products rose following the popularity surge of coffee drinks. As a result, food service high tea suitable products, such as outsourced pastries, are also in demand to resellers, coffee shops, and tea shops.

If you’re a newbie reseller of goods that are usually eaten during High Tea, knowing the basics of buying food service high tea products will help you boost your market and product intelligence.

An ongoing affair with tea

It’s worthy to realize how far the tea industry has come. Although the Aboriginal Australians did drink Leptospermum, a plant infusion which is similar to tea, the history of mainstream tea prior to or in lieu of heavy dinner meals traces back to the Brits’ arrival in the 1700s. Since then, tea has been an essential part of every Australian household’s meal and culture.

High Tea vs. Afternoon Tea

If you’re a newbie in the tea shop or pastry reselling business, you should be knowledgeable enough to know the difference between High Tea and Afternoon Tea. This will also help you in differentiating the right set of goods that go along with High Tea, which in turn helps you know the right products to sell. Click here Country Chef

High Tea

High Tea got its name because it was eaten by people in their high chairs during or before dinner. Historically, High Tea originated from the working class lifestyle, where they considered it as a necessity instead of a luxury. Knowing that they often go home late between 6-8pm, High Tea evolved as a replacement for the loftier Afternoon Tea. High Tea for the English family consists of bread, cheese, potatoes, biscuits, vegetables, tea, and sometimes pieces of meat.

Afternoon Tea

On the other hand, Afternoon Tea happens in low, relaxing chairs and tables, while goods such as finger sandwiches, cheese, cakes, and other sweet pastries are served. It was the preceding version before the upper class mixed high tea recipes and labelled it as “high tea” because of its practicality. High tea recipes were easier to prepare and can be used as a replacement for dinner meals, hence the marrying of the two.

Food Service Goods for High Tea

What would be the best types of products to serve for High Tea markets?

The most beloved food service high tea products usually consist of baked goods. For instance, if you know suppliers or bakers from dessert packs food service and baked goods food service, you can ask for recipes with banana bread. Other than that, you can also purchase scones, Pavlova, shortcakes, Meringue and Éclairs.

Is there a supplier who’s selling convenient packages of baked goods?

Whether you’re a reseller of packed desserts or a restaurateur who wants to sell outsourced pastries, baked goods in packages will always be a smart and cost-efficient choice. If you’re near to or living on Sunshine Coast, you can contact the likes of The Country Chef Bakery Co. They sell individually-wrapped banana bread if you’re aiming to target markets of busy consumers who want their pastries and bread on-the-go.

Remember that the modern Afternoon Tea is mistaken for being similar to High Tea in many countries and major cities, even London. If you’re planning to sell each separate set of baked goods for High Tea and Afternoon Tea, identifying their differences will help you cater to your target market easier and faster.

 

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